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Archive for the ‘Autonomous’ Category

Migrating Amazon Redshift to Autonomous Data Warehouse Cloud

In Autonomous, Data Warehouse, DBA, Exadata, PostgreSQL on July 4, 2018 at 18:34

“Big Data wins games but Data Warehousing wins championships” says Michael Jordan. Data Scientists create the algorithm, but as Todd Goldman says, if there is no data engineer to put it into production for use by the business, does it have any value?

If you google for Amazon Redshift vs Oracle, you will find lots of articles on how to migrate Oracle to Redshift. Is it worth it? Perhaps in some cases before Oracle Autonomous Data Warehouse Cloud existed.

Now, things look quite different. “Oracle Autonomous Data Warehouse processes data 8-14 times faster than AWS Redshift. In addition, Autonomous Data Warehouse Cloud costs 5 to 8x less than AWS Redshift. Oracle performs in an hour what Redshift does in 10 hours.” At least according to Oracle Autonomous Data Warehouse Cloud white paper. And I have nothing but great experiences with ADWC. For the past half an year or so.

But, what are the major issues and problems reported by Redshift users?

One of the most common complaints involves how Amazon Redshift handles large updates. In particular, the process of moving massive data sets across the internet requires substantial bandwidth. While Redshift is set up for high performance with large data sets, “there have been some reports of less than optimal performance,” for the largest data sets. An article by Alan R. Earls entitled Amazon Redshift review reveals quirks, frustrations claims that reviewers want more from the big data service. So:

Why to migrate from Amazon Redshift to Autonomous Data Warehouse Cloud?

1. Amazon Redshift is ranked 2nd in Cloud Data Warehouse with 14 reviews vs Oracle Exadata which is ranked 1st in Data Warehouse with 55 reviews.

The top reviewer of Amazon Redshift writes “It processes petabytes of data and supports many file formats. Restoring huge snapshots takes too long”. The top reviewer of Oracle Exadata writes “Thanks to smart scans, the amount of data transferred from storage to database nodes significantly decreases”.

2. Oracle Autonomous dominates in features and capabilities:

DB-engines shows an excellent system properties comparison of Amazon Redshift vs. Oracle.

In addition, reading through these thoughts on using Amazon Redshift as a replacement for an Oracle Data Warehouse can be worthwhile. It shows how Amazon Redshift compares with a more traditional DW approach. But Enterprises have some Redshift concerns, including:

– The difference between versions of PostgreSQL and the version Amazon uses with Redshift
– The scalability of very large data volume is limited and performance suffers
– The query interface is not modern, interface is a bit behind
– Redshift needs more flexibility to create user-defined functions
– Access to the underlying operating system and certain database functions and capabilities aren’t available
– Starting sizes may be too large for some use cases
– Redshift also resides in a single AWS availability zone

3. Amazon Redshift has several limitation: Limits in Amazon Redshift. On the other hand, you can hardly find a database feature not yet implemented by Oracle.

4. But the most important reason why to migrate to ADWC is that the Oracle Autonomous Database Cloud offers total automation based on machine learning and eliminates human labor, human error, and manual tuning.

How to migrate from Amazon Redshift to Autonomous Data Warehouse Cloud?

Use the SQL Developer Amazon Redshift Migration Assistant which is available with SQL Developer 17.4. It provides easy migration of Amazon Redshift environments on a per-schema basis.

Here are the 5 steps on how to migarte from Amazon Redshift to Autonomous Data Warehouse Cloud:

1. Connect to Amazon Redshift
2. Start the Cloud Migration Wizard
3. Review and Finish the Amazon Redshift Migration
4. Use the Generated Amazon Redshift Migration Scripts
5. Perform the Post Migration Tasks

Check out what Paul Way says about why Oracle thinks Autonomous IT can ultimately win the Cloud War.

Finally, here is what Amazon CTO Werner Vogels is saying: Our cloud offers any database you need. And I agree with him that a one size fits all database doesn’t fit anyone. But mission and business critical enterprise systems with huge requirements and resource needs deserve only the best.

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The DBA profession beyond autonomous: a database without a DBA is like a tree without roots

In Autonomous, Cloud, Databases, DBA on May 30, 2018 at 19:41

“To make a vehicle autonomous, you need to gather massive streams of data from loads of sensors and cameras and process that data on the fly so that the car can ‘see’ what’s around it” Daniel Lyons

Let me add that the data must be stored somewhere, analyzed by some software, monitored and backed up by someone, and so on and so on…

Top 5 Industry Early Adopters Of Autonomous Systems are: (1) Information Technology: Oracle’s Autonomous Data Warehouse Cloud, (2) Automotive, (3) Manufacturing, (4) Retail and (5) Healthcare.

Being an early adopter of ADWC, I must say that it is probably the best product created by Oracle Corporation. For sure part of Top Five.

This month (May 2018), ComputerWeekly published an article quoting Oracle CEO Mark Hurd that the long-term future of database administrators could be at risk if every enterprise adopts the Oracle 18c autonomous database.

“Hurd said it could take almost a year to get on-premise databases patched, whereas patching was instant with the autonomous version. If everyone had the autonomous database, that would change to instantaneous.”

So where does that leave Oracle DBAs around the world? Possibly in the unemployment queue, at least according to Hurd.

“There are hundreds of thousands of DBAs managing Oracle databases. If all of that moved to the autonomous database, the number would change to zero,” Hurd said at an Oracle media event in Redwood Shores, California.

If you are interested in more detail on this subject, I suggest you read the following articles in the order below:

The Robots are coming by James Anthony: “But surely we’ve been here before? Indeed, a quick Google search brings up the following examples of white papers by Oracle with a reference to the database being self-managing all the way back to 2003.”

Oracle Autonomous Database and the Death of the DBA by Tim Hall: “Myself and many others have been talking about this for over a decade. ”

Death of the DBA, Long Live the DBA by Kellyn Pot’Vin-Gorman: “With DBAs that have been around a while, we know the idea that you don’t need a DBA has been around since Oracle 7, the self-healing database.”

No DBA Required? by Tim Hall: “It will be interesting to see what Oracle actually come up with at the end of all this…”

Self-Driving Databases are Coming: What Next for DBAs? by Maria Colgan: “It’s also important for DBAs to remember that the transition to an autonomous environment is not something that will occur overnight.”

Death of the Oracle DBA (again) by Johanthan Stuart: “Twenty years later I run Claremont’s Managed Services practice and the DBA group is our largest delivery team.”

Don’t Fall For The “Autonomous Database” Distraction by Greg McStravick: a totally different point of view on autonomous databases.

Now, “a picture is worth a thousand words”. Here are 5 screenshots from the Autonomous Data Warehouse Cloud documentation:

1. Who will be creating external tables using the DBMS_CLOUD package?

2. Who will run “alter database property set.. ” in order to create credentials for the Oracle Cloud Infrastructure?

3. Who will restore and recover the database in case of any type of failure? Or failures never happen, right?

4. Who will manage run away SQL with cs_resource_manager and run “alter system kill session”?

5. Who will manage the CBO statistics and add hints?

As of today, we have 4 Exadata choices with Autonomous being by far the best. For data warehouse loads for now. As explained by Alan Zeichick, Autonomous Capabilities Will Make Data Warehouses — And DBAs — More Valuable. “No need for a resume writer: DBAs will still have plenty of work to do.”

So still: a database without a DBA is like a tree without roots.

P.S. Check out the book Human + Machine: Reimagining Work in the Age of AI by Paul R. Daugherty and H. James (Jim) Wilson.