Dontcheff

Unified Auditing for Top-Level Statements in the Oracle Database

In DBA, Oracle database, PL/SQL, Security and auditing, SQL on April 4, 2022 at 07:26

Auditing a database has undoubtfully its benefits and more, but for the DBA, this can cause serious headaches in terms of managing space and performance. Especially in the cloud, where security and auditing is even more important that on premises.

Did you know that there are 239 available audit actions in 19c? select * from AUDIT_ACTIONS; shows them all.

A new database feature introduced in 19c and 21c, called “auditing top-level statements“, can help us minimize the issue with space and performance (caused by auditing), by ignoring SQL statements that run from within PL/SQL procedures, triggers or functions, as they may be less relevant for auditing purposes.

Inside the Oracle database, a top-level statement is a statement that is executed directly by a user, not a statement that is run from within a PL/SQL procedure.

Top-level statements from the user SYS can be also audited. The unified audit trail can grow immensely if all statements are audited. Especially when there is a large number of audit trail records that are generated for a single statement in the unified audit policy. With auditing only top-level statements, we can reduce the audit of the recursive SQL statements. An example of this scenario would be audits for the DBMS_STATS.GATHER_DATABASE_STATS statement, which can generate over 200,000 individual audit records.

The unified audit records are written to a table in the AUDSYS schema called AUD$UNIFIED. Access to the AUDSYS. AUD$UNIFIED table is provided via the view SYS.UNIFIED_AUDIT_TRAIL. Here is the size of AUD$UNIFIED in an autonomous database where I have not configured any out of the box auditing. The auditing options enabled by default in ADB are logon, alter user, insert, update and change password:

Note that there are two components to the Audit Trail: (1) the AUDSYS schema in the database and (2) the spillover files on disk. More details in Receiving ORA-55940: An error occurred during execution of ktliIngestExternData by Mike Dietrich.

The X$UNIFIED_AUDIT_TRAIL table is owned by SYS, it is not in the SYSAUD schema! Check Unified Auditing – some insights by Thomas Saviour and X$UNIFIED_AUDIT_TRAIL is slow by Magnus Johansson for more details.

Now, configuring an Unified Audit Policy to capture only Top-Level statements is simple:

The ONLY TOPLEVEL clause in the CREATE AUDIT POLICY statement enables you to audit only the SQL statements that are directly issued by an end user by honoring the audit configuration in the audit policy.

In my autonomous database, I have decided to top-level audit all actions from SYS and ADMIN:

Here are other examples of auditing Top-Level statements.

It is important to understand that the ONLY TOPLEVEL clause has no impact on the output for an individual unified audit trail record. The only effect that ONLY TOPLEVEL has on a policy is to limit the number of records generated for the given unified audit policy.

P.S. 10 years go I wrote a blog post entitled Auditing vs. Performance in the Oracle Database. This topic is after all still relevant and important. With a colleague of mine from Australia, about a month ago, we could not figure out why auditing was causing performance issues – after unifying all possible efforts, not records 🙂 The problem could be only reproduced on Exadata. Still a mystery to us.

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