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Archive for July, 2019|Monthly archive page

Oracle Autonomous Database: Dedicated vs Serverless

In Autonomous, Databases, DBA, Exadata, Oracle database, Oracle Engineered Systems on July 22, 2019 at 11:45

This blog post describes the 5 main differences between ATP-D & ATP-S and the 5 main ATP-D physical characteristics and constraints.

Autonomous Transaction Processing Dedicated (ATP-D) is a deployment choice that enables us to provision autonomous databases into dedicated Exadata cloud infrastructure instead of a shared infrastructure with other tenants.

ATP-D can be used for both OLTP or hybrid workloads for databases of any size. ATP-D is specifically good when you need highest governance, consistent performance and operational control.

For now, dedicated infrastructure means a Quarter Exadata Rack. Half and Full will be soon available too.

Besides complete physical storage isolation, ATP-D provides private IP networking, secure connections using transport layer security (TLS) credentials, and customization of software image lifecycle to align with application lifecycle.

The Fleet Administrator (think of a DBA for Autonomous Cloud) needs to create first the Exadata Infrastructure, then the CDB and only at the end the PDB. Recall that for ATP-S, you directly create the PDB.

These are the 5 main differences between ATP-D and ATP-S:

– Private IPs are not yet supported for serverless ADB deployments but they are on the short-term roadmap
– Private IPs are supported with ATP-Dedicated

– Serverless edition has no minimums or maximums for terms of usage
– Dedicated edition has a minimum term of one month and the minimum OCPU purchase is 1 OCPU per database node and up to the maximum number of OCPUs per rack: $26.88 per hours which means about $645 per day

– Loading data from object stores via DBMS_CLOUD is the recommended method for loading large data sets
– DBMS_CLOUD to load data is not applicable for ATP-D because DBMS_CLOUD is not available on ATP-D

– In ATP-D, the database version is 19c which is required for Auto-Indexing which is on by default
– Support for 19c / Auto-Indexing on ATP-S is on the roadmap

– ADB (serverless) does have auto-scaling – you can select auto scaling during provisioning or later using the Scale Up/Down button on the Oracle Cloud Infrastructure console
– ATP-D does not have auto-scaling support

Here are the 5 main ATP-D physical characteristics and constraints:

1. Quarter rack X7 Exadata Infrastructure:
– 2 severs: 92 OCPUs and 1.44TB RAM
– 3 Storage Servers: 76.8TB Flash and 107TB Disk

2. Cluster / Virtual Cloud Network:
– 1 Cluster per quarter rack

3. Autonomous Container Database:
– Maximum of 4 CDBs per Cluster
– The default data and temporary tablespaces for the database are configured automatically
– The name of the default data tablespace is DATA
– The database character set is Unicode AL32UTF8
– Compression is not enabled by default – use the table_compression clause if needed

4. Autonomous Database:
– High Availability SLA – Maximum 200 DBs
– Extreme Availability SLA – Maximum 25 DBs
– Placement Logic – Open on 1 server < 16 OCPU

5. Types of Users: Fleet Admin, Database Admin and Database User as Fleet Admin activities separated from DB Admin using IAM privileges

Note that now, there are 2 tabs for possible database connections – the serverless style DB connection and application connection:

Fleet Administrator: Fleet administrators create, monitor and manage Autonomous Exadata Infrastructure and Autonomous Container Database resources – a fleet administrator must be an Oracle Cloud user whose permissions permit the management of these resources and permit the use of the networking resources that need to be specified when creating these resources

Database Administrator: DBAs create, monitor and manage Autonomous Databases. Additionally, they create and manage Oracle Database users within these databases, and provide others the information necessary access the database – when creating an Autonomous Database resource, the DBA defines and gains access to the ADMIN administrative user account for the database

Database User: Database users are the developers who write applications that connect to and use an Autonomous Database to store and access the data. Database users do not need Oracle Cloud accounts: they gain network connectivity to and connection authorization information for the database from the database administrator

Few useful links:

A Using Oracle Database Features in Autonomous Transaction Processing
FAQs for Autonomous Transaction Processing – Dedicated
Data Center Regions for PaaS and IaaS
Oracle broadens the audience for Automated Transaction Database
2 Ways Oracle’s Autonomous Database Just Got More Useful

Bottom line: even with Autonomous, DBAs will be still needed!

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