Dontcheff

Can you use Oracle RAC on Third-Party Clouds?

In DBA on July 11, 2017 at 14:40

Q: Can you use Oracle RAC on Third-Party Clouds?
A: No.

The Licensing Oracle Software in the Cloud Computing Environment document states:

“This policy applies to cloud computing environments from the following vendors: Amazon Web Services – Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2), Amazon Relational Database Service (RDS) and Microsoft Azure Platform (collectively, the ‘Authorized Cloud Environments’). This policy applies to these Oracle programs.”

The document that lists “these Oracle Programs” does not include RAC (or Multitenant or In-Memory DB).

For more details check Markus Michalewicz’s (Oracle RAC Product Manager) white paper entitled: How to Use Oracle RAC in a Cloud? – A Support Question. The image about is slide 45/50 from the same paper.

And here is how to use Oracle Real Application Clusters (RAC) in the Oracle Database Cloud Service.

An interesting blog post by Brian Peasland entitled Oracle RAC on Third-Party Clouds concludes: “But if I were looking to move my company’s RAC database infrastructure to the cloud, I would seriously investigate the claims in this Oracle white paper before committing to the AWS solution. That last sentence is the entire point of this blog post.”

For business and mission critical applications I would by all means recommend Oracle Real Application Clusters on Oracle Bare Metal Cloud.

We should not forget that something works and something being supported are two totally different things. Even for the Oracle Cloud check the Known issues for Oracle Database Cloud Service document: Updating the cloud tooling on a deployment hosting Oracle RAC requires manual update of the Oracle Database Cloud Backup Module.

Conclusion: Oracle RAC can NOT be licensed (and consequently not be used) in the above mentioned cloud environments although such claims were published even yesterday in the internet (July 10, 2017).

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  1. Nice summary with references to various, relevant sources. Thank you.

    As you are referring to my “white paper entitled: How to Use Oracle RAC in a Cloud? – A Support Question” and you used a picture of mine from this deck (slide 21 of 50), I would like to suggest you also use slide 45 of 50, which more adequately describes the case that you are talking about in your article, as it refers to shared storage in cloud environments.

    However, I fully agree with “We should not forget that something works and something being supported are two totally different things.” Thanks.

  2. […] For existing Oracle installations, it might make sense to move from your existing on-premise hardware into the cloud if you are faced with buying new hardware. Note that some features are only available on Oracle’s IaaS cloud – for example, you can’t run Oracle RAC on Amazon or Microsoft. […]

  3. […] For existing Oracle installations, it might make sense to move from your existing on-premise hardware into the cloud if you are faced with buying new hardware. Note that some features are only available on Oracle’s IaaS cloud – for example, you can’t run Oracle RAC on Amazon or Microsoft. […]

  4. Hello Julian,

    Nice article. Since the nature of your post deals with Oracle licensing and license policy, I figured I’d chime in.

    I was a license auditor in Oracle’s License Management Services (LMS) group in the Oracle HQ/Bay Area office. I now work as an independent Oracle licensing expert and help clients with Oracle license management (Oracle audit defense, optimization, VMware, purchase/contract negotiation, etc.).

    In your article, you reference Oracle’s policy on licensing in AWS and Azure. The key thing to point out that the policy, and everything in it, is of no contractual implication – put simply, it’s contractually meaningless. The only authority on Oracle licensing is what you and Oracle signed – policy dictates, and even announcements from their licensing group, cannot change what you signed. And there is nothing in Oracle contracts that in any way create the limitations set out in the cloud licensing “policy” document. In fact, the footer of the policy document that you referenced says it’s for “educational purposes only”. Put simply, there is no contractual reason to not be able to run RAC (or any other Oracle product) in AWS, Azure, or even Google Cloud (contractually, there is no such thing as “Authorized Environment” – so that fiction gets thrown out too).

    For further detailed reading, I would point you to a Northern California OUG article I published recently: http://nocoug.org/Journal/NoCOUG_Journal_201705.pdf. The first part of this article was published just before the Oracle policy was heavily revised, and can be read here: http://nocoug.org/Journal/NoCOUG_Journal_201702.pdf.

    As an independent advisor, I have not preferred choice. I advise my clients to do what fits them best – I’m not concerned if its AWS, Azure, GCP, or Oracle Cloud for that matter. But their decision-making should not be “cloud”ed by baseless “policy” documents that ultimately have no teeth. I would know – I was an auditor in Oracle and have now assisted many clients, including Fortune 25 clients, in dealing with Oracle’s licensing challenges.

    I hope this is helpful.

    Thanks,

    Mohammad Inamullah

    Principal, Redwood Compliance
    mohammad@redwoodcompliance.com
    http://www.redwoodcompliance.com
    Palo Alto, California

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